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Fuel Efficiency Tire Care

Tire Alignment Basics

The proper alignment of your car’s tires are crucial in order for it to
perform adequately. When mechanics talk about tire alignment, they
are looking specifically at toe, camber, and caster alignment.
Having your wheels aligned correctly will help keep you safe on the
road and boost your fuel economy.

What Does Alignment Refer To?

When someone tells you that your tires need to be aligned, they are
referring to adjusting the vehicle’s suspension so that the wheels
are angled correctly. Wheels can be adjusted by placing the car on
an alignment rack and having a computer measure the angles of the
wheels. The person working on your car will then adjust the wheels
based on these measurements. Four-wheel alignments are recommended
over two-wheel alignments, because four-wheel alignments will
properly adjust all four wheels at the same time.

Why Should I Get My Tires Aligned?

Getting your tires properly aligned is important for not only your safety,
but also the lifespan of your tires. Proper tire alignment makes
handling your vehicle significantly easier. Wheels that are out of
alignment will lead to tires that have uneven tread wear. Getting
your tires aligned is easy at places such as Action
Gator Tire
, and they offer a four-wheel alignment service that
will allow you to maximize the life of your tires and cut down on
fuel costs.

When Do I Need a Tire Alignment?

There are no specific requirements for how often you should get your tires
aligned. However, wheels can come out of alignment from everyday
driving, or from hitting potholes or curbs. There are a few indications that your tires
need to be aligned. Here are some of the ways that you can tell when
your vehicle’s wheels need to be aligned:

  • Vehicle pulls strongly to one side

  • Uneven or abnormal tire wear

  • Steering wheel vibration

  • Steering wheel off center

Toe, Caster, and Camber

There are three factors that contribute to proper wheel alignment: toe,
caster, and camber. Toe alignment is the measurement between tires.
When viewed from above, the tires should be parallel to each other
and in equal positions. Caster is the angle of the steering pivot,
and plays a huge role in balancing steering and stability. Positive
caster means that the steering axis tilts toward the driver, while
negative caster means that the steering axis tilts toward the front
end of your vehicle. Lastly, camber is the angle of the wheel, and
it should not have too much inward or outward tilt (negative and
positive camber). Instead, it should be perpendicular to the ground.

Boost Your Performance and Schedule a Wheel Alignment

Getting four-wheel alignment is important because it can help you prolong the
life of your tires and boost the performance of your vehicle.
Vehicles that are out of alignment will suffer from uneven tread wear
and poor tire performance. It is recommended that you schedule an
appointment immediately if you suspect you are in need of a wheel
alignment.

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Fuel Efficiency Sustainability Tire Care Trucking Industry

Tips to Avoid Problems When Using Snowfall Tires

Tips to Avoid Problems Using Snowfall Tires Using a Tire Pressure Monitoring System

Tire Pressure Monitoring SystemsOver the last few years the government has cracked down on car drivers who have switched tires for the season but haven’t had their Tire Pressure Monitoring System (TPMS) replaced. Most garages used to replace them for free back in the day but nowadays you will see plenty of garages charging for this.

The truth is that you can avoid this, and you can also avoid having any issues with your TPMS when you switch from summer to winter tires.

One big tip is to avoid pot holes because our roads are scattered with these annoying dips and they do have a massive effect on tire pressure, not just in cold conditions but during any time of the year.  If you are driving on well-known routes then just pay attention to these, and avoid them if you can.

 

Why Does Cold Weather Affect my TPMS?

Snow is always going to set off your TPMS sensor, and it won’t take long until you see that lovely light illuminate your dash.

Are you ready for the science behind this?

When we get a bout of cold spells, or snow, the air in your tire will become much denser than when it is warm, especially when the car has been left overnight during a particular cold or snowy period.

However, as soon as you have drove around for 20-30 minutes you should notice that as the tires get warmer through friction, your light on the dashboard should turn itself off. Just give this tip a try before you decide to take it to our local garage as you should find that this works. Oh, and you shouldn’t worry too much on colder mornings if you see your TPMS light show up, that is normal behavior.

If you are seeing the light more frequently, just be aware that for every 10 degree drop in temperature, you will lose on average 1 pound of air pressure out of each tire.

This brings us nicely onto nitrogen for your tires.

 

So Why Use Nitrogen?

If you don’t check your tire pressure regularly then some good advice is to start using Nitrogen which will help in reducing TPMS resets.

Most new cars come with these funky new dashboard lights that tell you when your tire pressure is low. The problem is, you will stop by a garage and pump air into them, and then hey presto a few weeks later that lights back on again.

However, if you were to use nitrogen your tire could last months longer, meaning you don’t have to see that annoying flashing light appear so often.

You see, replacing oxygen, water vapor and other gases that go into a standard tire, with nitrogen, will mean your tire pressure will maintain at a certain level for a lot longer. So if you were to use 95% nitrogen in your tires you would be looking at a retainer of optimal pressure for as much as 4 times longer than if you had 22% of oxygen, water vapor and other gases.

Perhaps the biggest reason for people using nitrogen is that not only can you keep a well-balanced tire pressure but you can increase fuel efficiency, safety and generally a longer tire life for each of the 4 tires on your car.

Learn more about tire sensors at the Tire Sensor Warehouse.

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Fuel Efficiency News Roundup Sustainability

Are we closer today than ten years ago to the widespread use of hybrid cars, truck and alternative fuels

“Are we closer today than ten years ago to the widespread use of hybrid cars, truck and alternative fuels” ? Absolutely.

We are at a point in the evolution of green cars where it is now realistic that at some point in the future, they will be the most widely used car. The quality of these cars is constantly improving and the latest news about these vehicles means we may be closer to the world using predominately environmentally friendly cars than we think. Electric & Hybrid cars are growing in popularity and even solar powered cars don’t seem as farfetched these days based on the latest news from Ford.
The reasons to buy a green car makes a lot more sense now than it would have 10 years ago. The current batch of vehicles have are more efficient and now have a range of up to 265 miles and are available for as little as $22,000.
Of course, a lot of people don’t have a green car yet but there is still a lot you can do to have a positive impact on the environment. For example, car pooling with friends and even leaving your car at home two days a week will reduce greenhouse emissions by an average of two tons per year.

​It’s Matt Allan… ​
Hybrid Cars and Alternative Energy
Crossline on the Fort

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Fuel Efficiency Managed Fleets Nitrogen Tire Inflation Saving Money

Saving Money on Gas: 4 Ways Managed Fleets Can Do It

nitrogen tire inflation for managed fleetsFuel costs are one of the biggest costs for managed fleets, but also one of the hardest to decrease without hurting fleet productivity.  Offsetting some of the expenses to drivers may have consequences on employee morale and retention . Reducing usage could mean fewer routes, fewer vehicles on the road, and less revenue overall. Fortunately, with the right data, fleet managers can save money on gas without long-term consequences on the fleet and the company. Here are four ways managed fleets can save money on fuel:

Implementing a Fuel Card Program

Every fleet manager wants to trust their employees, and a fuel card program may seem like a way to “look over everyone’s shoulder” as they refuel vehicles at the gas station. But, a program can eliminate the small non-fuel purchases that drivers add on, such as a soda or a pack of cigarettes. Each individual driver may not intend harm and deceit by adding those purchases, but if every driver is doing that, then every single one of those purchases will add unnecessary expenses to the fleet’s fuel costs. The drivers may not see their small non-fuel purchases as a big deal, but they do mean thousands of dollars spent on items that have nothing to do with refilling the tank.

Considering Fuel-Efficient Vehicles for Upcoming Fleet Purchases

Switching out the entire fleet for brand new vehicles is a massive and expensive overhaul, but when the time comes to purchase new vehicles, opting for more fuel-efficient models is a great way to start. With one or two fuel-efficient fleet vehicles, it’s easy to measure and compare the fuel economy between the old and the new vehicles. After that, those numbers can be extrapolated across a 100- or 1000-vehicle fleet to determine how much gas would be saved if every single vehicle in the fleet was a fuel-efficient model. This data can justify a gradual overhaul or switching out a few more vehicles.

Improving Route Planning with a Fleet-Tracking System

Utilizing a fleet-tracking system will provide a managed fleet with hard data on where vehicles are going and how they are getting there, highlighting various opportunities for improvement. For example, many GPS fleet tracking system show current traffic conditions, so drivers can opt for a different route, reducing travel time and gas usage. A tracking system can also show where any fleet vehicle is at any given time, so if someone needs to be dispatched to a specific location, the fleet manager will know which one is closest and can send that vehicle. Fleet tracking isn’t just to make sure that drivers aren’t using company vehicles for personal purposes on the weekends. The traffic and location data can be used to ensure that gas and time isn’t wasted needlessly.

Using Nitrogen Tire Inflation

Nitrogen can improve fuel economy by 3 percent by keeping tires at their proper tire pressure for longer periods of time. Although regular air can also be used to maintain proper tire pressure, nitrogen tires lose their pressure at a slower rate than those filled with regular air, thus providing the benefits of proper tire pressure (increased fuel economy, increased traction, increased tire life etc.) for much longer. Switching to nitrogen tire inflation does take an initial investment because fleets need to purchase a special machine for the inflation, but much like using a fleet vehicle with better gas mileage, the benefits exponentially increase with each vehicle that uses nitrogen.

Overall, saving money on gas requires tracking and measuring current usage so that the fleet can find ways to cut costs. It’s not enough to say, “we need to use less.” To save money on gas, fleets need to know where is being wasted and improve fuel economy or efficiency in those areas.

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Fuel Efficiency Managed Fleets

5 Great Fleet Vehicle Picks

This is a guest post from Bob Carlson. Bob retired last year from a 40-year career teaching high school math. Blogging keeps him out of trouble with the wife.

For fleet operators looking to add vehicles to their fleet, the overall cost of maintaining and operating any size vehicle is a major consideration. Any decent fleet operator is always looking for ways to cut costs—for instance, some fleet owners are installing nitrogen-filled tires on their vehicles, thanks to their reliability under heavy use and their fuel-saving potential. The data analysis firm Vincentric recently held its annual Best Fleet Value awards, highlighting the top models for fleet operators based on a variety of factors, including operating and opportunity costs. Here are five notable vehicles that got a nod for great value in their respective categories:

Ford C-Max Energi SEL

Photo by Mariordo via Wikimedia Commons

The C-Max Energi is one of several hybrids on Vincentric’s list, but it’s the only plug-in hybrid that made the cut. The C-Max offers the lowest taxes and opportunity costs of all the current picks over the three-year ownership period, but offers higher-than-average fuel costs in its segment.

Ford F-150 XL Reg Cab 2WD

Photo by IFCAR via Flickr

The F-150 isn’t just a hit with consumers in search of a reliable and dependable truck. Fleet buyers also see the half-ton full-size pickup truck’s proven credentials in the field and elsewhere, as well as its lower-than-average insurance, maintenance and operating costs. The F-150 also offers a unique fuel-saving proposition in the form of the 3.5-liter EcoBoost six-cylinder engine, capable of achieving an EPA-estimated 16 mpg city and 22 mpg highway in two-wheel drive guise. However, it remains to be seen how fleets will cope financially or time-wise with the engine’s added complexity. According to Ford, sales of the EcoBoost-equipped F-150 have already reached 400,000 units in the United States.

Nissan Leaf S

Photo by Tennen-Gas via Wikimedia Commons

According to data from Vincentric, the Leaf S offers better-than-average depreciation and extraordinarily low taxes due to federal and state incentives, but it’s on par with others in its segment in terms of fuel, maintenance and repair costs. The Leaf’s all-electric drivetrain also provides fleets with an economical way to shrink their carbon footprint and flex their eco-friendly credentials.

Buick Enclave Convenience FWD

Photo by IFCAR via Flickr

The Enclave is one of four Buicks that made the cut, taking top honors in the convenience four-door utility segment. Vincentric notes that Buick’s full-size crossover offered the lowest lifecycle costs in 15 of its 20 deciding criteria. Not only does it offer the lowest three-year ownership costs across the board, it also surprises many premium fleet owners with its exceptional level of luxury and comfort.

Hyundai Sonata GLS 2.4

Photo by IFCAR via Wikimedia Commons

For 2013, the Sonata proves itself as a competent choice in the mid-size sedan segment, especially in the face of strong competition from Ford and Toyota. As with last year’s Sonata, the 2013 model offers three-year fuel, depreciation and repair costs that are well-below segment averages.

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Fuel Efficiency Sustainability Video

Fuel Economy: There’s More at Play than Just Engine Size

VW L1
Photo by RudolfSimon via Wikimedia Commons

Size matters, but not as much as you think. When it comes to fuel-efficient cars, the best ones have a combination of good aerodynamics, lightweight, low drive line, and a small or medium-size engine.

Eco-friendly cars are the way of the future. More vehicle, parts, and tire manufacturers are coming up with new and creative ways to offer consumers the best fuel-efficient and environmentally-sound cars. Not only do these eco-vehicles save on gas and energy, they do their part for environmental carbon reduction. FuelEconomy.gov reports 1.6 billion metric tons of greenhouse gases are emitted into the atmosphere by highway vehicles each year. That’s 20 pounds of carbon dioxide per gallon of gas. Drivers who choose hybrid and electric vehicles greatly reduce the amount of carbon emissions entering the atmosphere which helps slow climate change.

Motorists may not be able to get their hands on the VW XL1 quite yet, but can still make savvy decisions to wring the best mileage from vehicles fitting the following criteria.

VW claims the XL1 is the most fuel efficient car ever with an estimated 261 mpg.

Vehicle Aerodynamics

Optimal fuel economy requires a vehicle that is aerodynamic. Aerodynamic designs look sleek and can improve fuel efficiency by one mile per gallon, when compared to vehicles that do not move through the air as easily.

The visual profile of a vehicle can help determine whether it is aerodynamic or not. Although some exceptions exist, a boxy shape is usually less aerodynamic than vehicles with a slight curve. Look for cars that curve along the top and back. Avoid vehicles with a clear box-type shape, which will require more effort to move forward.

Use vehicles lower to the ground. Cars with less air flowing below will not be slowed down or fight against wind on the top and bottom of the vehicle.

Vehicle Weight

The weight of the vehicle plays a significant role in fuel efficiency. As a general rule, a heavier car or truck will have a lower mile per gallon, on average, than a lighter vehicle. Tirebuyer.com advises against purchasing a heavy vehicle, like a van or truck, unless it is necessary for your job, family or terrain. It is more fuel efficient to select a Sedan, compact vehicle or Coupe.

Select a vehicle that has a lower weight, if possible. Even if you need a larger vehicle, look at the weight of the vehicle and compare it. An extra 100 pounds in your vehicle will cause your fuel efficiency to drop by roughly two percent. Pay attention to the weight of the vehicle when you are making a selection to get better gas mileage within the specific class of vehicles.

Even the type of tires you buy can affect the weight and fuel efficiency of your vehicle. Under-inflated tires can make your car work harder and use more gas. Nitrogen-inflated tires lose air four times slower than air-inflated tires that also contain oxygen and water. Inflating your tires with nitrogen is also safer and improves tire wear and rim life.

Select a Vehicle With Low Drive Line Weight

Drive line weight is the weight of moving components within your vehicle. Whether you currently own a vehicle or want to buy a new car, changing out the axles, flywheel, crank shaft and other moving parts for lighter options will reduce your fuel expenses.

Stopping and Starting

Even if you select a vehicle that is designed to have better mileage, your actions behind the wheel will impact your fuel efficiency. The law of inertia states that objects in motion will continue moving until an external force causes it to stop. In the case of a vehicle, applying the brakes will cause it to stop. Unfortunately, if you are constantly stopping and then forcing the car into motion again, it will make your fuel efficiency drop.

The U.S. Department of Energy suggests that aggressive driving will actually reduce your fuel economy by roughly 33 percent. Drive at the speed limit to reduce the impact on your fuel.

Engine size and the amount of horsepower within a vehicle are only one factor that impacts your gas mileage. Before you buy a new car, take the weight of the vehicle and the aerodynamic design into account.

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Fuel Efficiency Guest Posts Hybrid Tires

5 Best Eco-Friendly Family Cars

eco-friendly vehiclesThis is a guest post from Kristine Vicencio.

Transporting your family is a big deal. Not only do you need a vehicle that allows plenty of space to transport at least more than two people, you need one that is safe and dependable. Even more ideal would be a vehicle that is also eco-friendly. While it may sound too good to be true, eco-friendly family cars are out there. Here are five of the best currently available, curated with the assistance of Parkers, a UK website that helps consumers research cars, insurance and finance.

Nissan Leaf: The Nissan Leaf, although slightly smaller making it possibly not the best fit for a very large family, the Leaf is one of the first entirely electrical vehicles made by Nissan. thought to be a zero-emission car, the Nissan Leaf can go 80 miles on one charge. Although the Nissan Leaf was first released in 2012, the Leaf has quickly become popular and has characteristics that make it ideal for smaller families looking for an environmentally friendly vehicle. Starting at $32,500, the Nissan Leaf is also fairly affordable.

Toyota Prius: Although the Prius may often be thought to be small, it’s actually considered a mid-sized sedan and is much roomier than it looks from the outside. The Toyota Prius is electric and can be entirely recharged within only a few hours, making it an extremely efficient car for families. Even better, the Prius has solid safety features such as a pre-collision system and lane keep assist, which makes it a very attractive eco-friendly car for families.

Toyota RAV4 EV: A nice size for larger families, this nifty SUV is battery-powered and successfully combines the spacious interior of a SUV without the gas-guzzling property. The Toyota RAV4 EV has a high-performance battery that is completely electric and can go approximately 100 miles on a single charge. An excellent choice for larger families, this Toyota SUV is affordable and environmentally friendly.

Ford Escape Hybrid: Both roomy and eco-friendly, the Ford Escape Hybrid has some of the best fuel economy ratings for SUVs in its class. In addition to its excellent fuel economy, the Ford Escape Hybrid is also roomy with advanced technological features that make it a perfect fit for families looking for an eco-friendly, yet convenient and larger vehicle.

Chevrolet Equinox: One of the most popular compact SUVs, the Chevrolet Equinox is another fantastic options for larger families seeking an environmentally friendly option. With an option of a V6 engine, the Chevrolet Equinox offers both power and fuel efficiency. Of course, there’s also the option of four-cylinder option as well. The Equinox also has excellent reliability scores making it an attractive prospect for families seeking a larger eco-friendly option.

Maybe now is the time to sell and change to something leaner, greener and cheaper to run? As you can see, there are plenty of vehicles on the market right now that will meet those basic requirements.

If you want to learn more about going green and driving hybrid vehicles (and hybrid tires), then check out our latest white paper on nitrogen tire inflation: 9 Debunked Myths on Nitrogen Tire Inflation. Click the link to download this white paper and to learn how nitrogen tire inflation can help you improve fuel efficiency and tire life.

Related Links:

3 Green Lights Tips for Going Green

How Older Drivers Can Lower Insurance Rates

3 Things You Need to Know about Buying New Tires

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Fuel Efficiency Nitrogen Tire Inflation Video

Nitrogen in Your Tires Part 2 [Video]

Below is part two of the nitrogen in your tires video series. You can catch part one here, although you don’t need to watch part one in order to understand part two. Enjoy!

Well, those prices are taking a hit on many people’s pocketbooks but there are ways to save a little moneyAnd it doesn’t involve buying a new car. Heidi Glaus joins us with more. Heidi –
Glaus: Well, yeah, with prices the way they are these days everyone is looking for the smallest thing to cut back on. Ken Lawton from Go Nitro Tire might have the solution. So, what are the benefits of filling your tires with nitrogen?
Lawton: Well, Heidi, the first and most important benefit is safety. Maintenance, fuel economy, and longer tire wear; these represent the core of benefits for nitrogen-inflated tires.
Glaus: So, this is the kind of machine we’re going to be looking at. But, unlike now when we pull up to a gas station, you can’t just put in a quarter, 50 cents, and fill up your tires. This is going to take somebody special.
Lawton: It’s going to take a technician. Typically, for a conventional car, it takes six to 10 minutes for all four tires simultaneously to be done
Glaus: And, that’ll cost a consumer how much?
Lawton: At a tire store or an automotive group, it’ll cost anywhere from $24.95 to $49.95.
Glaus: And, you were saying that these aren’t really everywhere yet?
Lawton: No, they’re not. There’s just under 500 nitrogen service providers here in the United States. That number is changing and growing rapidly but it’s still a small number for the size of the population.
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Fuel Efficiency Nitrogen Tire Inflation Video

Nitrogen in Your Tires Part 1 [Video]

One of the ways we that we come up with blog post ideas is that we look at competing blogs to find topic ideas that we haven’t yet covered. By simply taking a title, topic, or keyword, we then write our own nitrogen tire inflation article with our own perspective and information. It was through this routine process the other day that we came across a video of… ourselves.

While looking through the competitor’s blog, we found a post that had a video in it. We noticed that in the video screenshot was a man that looked a lot like Ken Lawton, the CEO of Nitrofleet99. Curious, we watched the video. Sure enough, it was Ken! Not only did this competitor post a video that showcased his competitor very clearly (the video introduces Ken and shoots a few seconds of Nitrofleet99’s banner) , the video was an interview with Ken about nitrogen tire inflation. The competitor was never featured in the two and half-minute piece! We found it interesting that our competitor shared a video about nitrogen tire inflation, but failed to consider the his direct competitor was the one prominently featured as the source and expert on the issue. He focused too much on the fact that the video was about nitrogen tire inflation.

We couldn’t not share this video and this story! The video (which is part one of two, another fact the competitor failed to notice) and its transcript are below. We will share part two and its transcript next week.

Transcript

But, with the average price of gas in St. Louis at $3.87 a gallon this morning, filling up your tank is not something to be taken lightly these days. But, there are ways to save a little money at the pump and Heidi Glaus is here to share the secrets. Heidi-

Glaus: Yeah, well there’s a lot to know about filling your tires and what that can do for your gas mileage. So, this is Ken Lawton and you’re all about the nitrogen, which is some people have probably heard about but maybe they don’t know exactly what filling your tires with nitrogen can do.

Lawton: Heidi, nitrogen tire inflation has been around for a very long time. The military, the NASCAR community, and big business has been using nitrogen for over twenty years.

Glaus: So, what you’re saying is that it hasn’t really been affordable to the common person for the last few years?

Lawton: It is completely been unaffordable due to the technology changes; in recent years have made it affordable to automotive groups and tire stores and the public in general. So, it is come of age.

Glaus: So what are we talking; what are the benefits of using nitrogen instead of, you know, oxygen?

Lawton: Well, it begins with aging. The oxygen in air degredates tires and causes premature aging. The tire of simply wears out more quickly. With nitrogen, what you have is the benefit of a completely dry, inert air that simply makes the tire perform as a hybrid. What you’re doing by converting to nitrogen is creating a hybrid tire.

Glaus: Really! So, we hear all about the hybrid cars and all of that and this is just what we’re doing to the tires. So, how much can somebody save on gas mileage by filling a tire with nitrogen?

Lawton: Well, various studies have been done by Ford Motors, Exxon Mobil has done studies as well. What we’re finding is savings up to ten percent on fuel and extended tire wear by up to 30 percent. This is significant information for consumers.

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Fuel Efficiency Proper Tire Pressure

How Maximum Tire Pressure and Saving Gas are Related

saving gas and maximum tire pressureWe came across two articles about gas saving myths and gas saving tips, and both article recommended that keeping tires as maximum tire pressure is best for fuel efficiency. Although the articles are correct that overinflation and underinflation are harmful, the idea of maximum tire pressure could be misleading. Here’s why:

The Number on the Sidewall

Many mistakenly believe that the number on the sidewall is the recommended tire pressure for the tire. This is false, as the number is the maximum tire pressure the tire can handle, according to the manufacturer. For the recommended tire inflation pressure, check the label located on the driver’s door or the owner’s manual. This is why the idea of keeping tires at maximum tire pressure can be misleading. Maximum tire pressure is overinflation, as it’s not recommended. The pressure label on the tire also does not indicate the manufacturer’s recommended tire inflation pressure, nor does it indicate the proper air pressure based on the vehicle the tire is mounted on.

If You Have Road Noise or an Extra Bumpy Ride, Your Tires aren’t at Proper Tire Pressure

The articles also state that with maximum tire pressure, you’ll have a bumpier ride and a bit more road noise, but you’ll also have the improved fuel efficiency so it’s a nice trade-off. This is also not true, because bumps and noise means that your tires aren’t at their proper tire pressure, so you are probably wasting gas instead of operating at top fuel efficiency. This is because tires that are over- or underinflated do not have the right contact with the road, destroying your tires and ruining your fuel inefficiency. The picture below demonstrates this phenomenon, where it’s obvious to see that without proper tire pressure, no aspect of your tires or your driving (which includes fuel efficiency, handling, tire life etc.) is at its best.

overinflated tires

What’s the Right Tire Pressure for Optimum Fuel Efficiency?

The proper tire pressure is what’s recommended, which as can be found in the owner’s manual or on the driver’s door (as previously stated). Do not go by the sidewall or your friend’s recommendation or what you feel is the right tire pressure. It’s also important to check your tire pressure regularly, and to make those checks when your tires are cool, so not right after you’ve come home and certainly not at the air pump at the gas station. You will have a more accurate reading when your tires are cool.

The best way to maintain proper tire pressure and to have optimum fuel efficiency is with nitrogen tire inflation. Nitrogen-filled tires maintain proper tire pressure for longer periods of time, which means you get that fuel efficiency boost without that bumpy ride and without overinflating your tires. Of course, nitrogen-filled tires still need to have their pressure checked regularly. Sure, they may take longer to lose their pressure, but that doesn’t mean that they never, ever lose it.

What’s the True Tire Pressure/Gas Saving Tip?

The accurate gas saving tip is to make sure that your tires are at proper tire pressure, the one that is recommended in the owner’s manual or on the driver’s door. You don’t ever want to be at maximum tire pressure, and you certainly don’t want to be using tires that are worn. Also, make it a habit to check your tire pressure regularly, and get nitrogen-filled tires if you can.

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