BLOG HOME

  >   Nitrogen for a Green Environment

Carbon Reduction

On March 5, 2022, in Uncategorized, by admin
0

Would you like to know how you can do more to help carbon reduction? Here are a few simple suggestions.

  • Switch to LED bulbs
  • Install a more efficient showerhead
  • Purchase an electric vehicle
  • Hold a clothes swap
  • Buy things that last
  • Encourage your team to communiet without a car
  • Buy consciously
  • Video conference more
  • Share car tips
  • Start a veggie garden

All of these things can allow anyone to help out the environment.

Tagged with:
 

Why Nitrogen Is Better Than Air In Tires

On February 27, 2022, in Uncategorized, by admin
0

Fact: Nitrogen permeates slower and so retains tire pressure longer than oxygen.

Vehicle breakdowns are never fun, especially during a winter storm. For businesses, fleet breakdowns can mean unhappy customers, late deliveries, and lost revenue. This can be detrimental for businesses that rely on vehicle fleets for service, such as HVAC or delivery services. You can help protect your fleet this winter by filling your tires with nitrogen.

The Science Behind Putting Nitrogen in Tires

Car tires are typically filled up with compressed air. Air is about 78% nitrogen and 21% oxygen, with additional small amounts of other gases. Nitrogen leaks out of tires slower than air because the molecules are larger, making it harder for them to escape. Nitrogen is also more stable in flocculating temperatures. It doesn’t shrink and swell like oxygen does because of its water content. This is especially important in colder climates, like New England.

1. Better Pressure Retention

One main benefit of filling your tires with nitrogen is less tire leakage, which results in tires preserving a high air pressure for longer, leading to less maintenance and longer tire life. Like compressed air, nitrogen can withstand cold temperatures, making it a viable option for driving in the winter.

2. Greater Fuel Efficiency 

Since nitrogen takes six times longer than oxygen to leak out of tires, nitrogen-filled tires stay full for significantly longer. Driving on full tires leads to better gas mileage and decreases tire damage.

3. Improved Handling 

Driving on ice or slippery roads in the winter can be dangerous. It’s important for drivers to be as safe as possible, which includes keeping their tire pressure full. This makes for a more controlled driving experience and decreases the chance of a flat tires, especially in the wintertime.

4. Prevent Rims from Corroding

Like moisture on a window, air compresses and produces condensation inside tires. Excess water can corrode the rims of the tire. This can be hard to detect since the car’s rims corrode from the inside. Additionally, if a gas station doesn’t maintain their air compressors, water can collect inside the hose. Water can enter the tire, which increases the risk of corrosion.

5. Extended Tire Life 

Nitrogen is more stable than air, which results in extended tire pressure and tire life. Since nitrogen is also dryer than air, there is less chance of tire corrosion. Also, nitrogen leaks out of tires at a slower rate, increasing tire longevity. Extending your tire life will save you money and reduce maintenance.

6. Sustainability

The longer a tire’s life, the less often it will need to be replaced; this reduces the amount of new tires manufacturers need to produce, as well as the consumption of raw materials.

FAQs About Nitrogen Tires in the Winter

Q: Is it safe to fill my tires with nitrogen?

A: Yes, filling tires with nitrogen is safe. In fact, nitrogen isn’t flammable, so tires won’t explode in a crash.

Q: Is nitrogen only good to use in the winter?

No, nitrogen tires can be used at any time. Many drivers, including racecar drivers use nitrogen tires year-round.

Q: Do I need special nitrogen tires?

No, you can fill any commercial tire with nitrogen.

Author Bio: Joseph Christmas is the Marketing Coordinator for Commercial Sales at Merchants Auto. He joined the team in March 2021 equipped with many years of experience in both marketing and the automotive industry. Joe’s pure passion and knowledge of cars have been tailored to this industry.

 

New Englanders have a lot to be proud of, including four seasons that offer breathtaking beauty and recreation. With these changing seasons comes the need to prepare for all types of weather, and your car is no exception.

Whether you have brand new or pre-owned vehicles, sedans or SUVs, work trucks or electric vehicles, proper maintenance is important — no matter the season. Here are some important tips to keep in mind.

Benefits of Proper Tire Maintenance

As AAA explains, tires affect braking, safety, and how your vehicle handles — all of which are crucial. You want to regularly make sure you have the right air pressure and tread depth, as well as proper alignment. Not only will this routine maintenance keep you and your passengers safe, but you’ll also save money on gas! According to the U.S. Department of Energy, you can improve your gas mileage up to 3% by keeping your tires properly inflated.

Tire Preparation for Winter

Many New Englanders opt for winter tires (or “snow tires”) in the colder months, but do you actually need them? In most cases, yes. As MotorTrend explains, “once temperatures approach and go past freezing, accompanied by snow and ice, all-season tires lose their capabilities — regardless of whether you have all-wheel drive.” Winter tires have certain rubber compounds and tread designs that allow for better gripping of the road in adverse weather.

Another set of tires might seem like an unnecessary expense but having two sets means your all-season tires will see less mileage per year, ultimately increasing their longevity.

Whether you opt for winter tires or stick to all-season ones, it’s important to make sure there is enough tread and proper air pressure. To check the tread, you can conduct a quick “penny test” by inserting a penny into the tire treads. If you can see Lincoln’s head, your tires are due for a rotation or replacement.

Tire Preparation for Spring

Spring weather in New England is hit or miss. You could see bright sunny skies one day and heavy rain the next, which means proper tire preparation and maintenance is crucial. If you have winter tires, it’s best to swap them out for your all-season ones once the snowy, icy weather is behind you. (Unfortunately for New Englanders, that could mean late spring!)

Check your all-season tires for tire pressure and signs of wear, including cracks. The spring is also a good time for a tire rotation and alignment since potholes and bumps in the road left over from winter can knock things off kilter.

Tire Preparation for Summer

Yes, you do need to prepare for tires for the hot, humid days of summer! Plus, it’s also the perfect time to replace tire pads and check the rotors.

Make sure your tread is even and that you have the correct tire pressure; sometimes, tires overinflate during the summer months due to air expanding in the warm temperatures.

Tire Preparation for Fall

Again, it’s time to check tread and tire pressure! Fall in New England often means warmer days and cooler nights, so there’s a good chance your tire pressure light may go on during the first sign of cold weather.

Additional Maintenance Tips for the Changing Seasons

Tires are certainly important, but here are some other points to keep in mind:

  • Get regular oil changes and have skilled professionals check your breaks and battery
  • Check your fluid levels and wiper blades
  • Ensure your heat and AC work before you need them

It also never hurts to research reputable auto body collision shops so you have one handy in the unfortunate event of an accident. And though it’s not specifically maintenance related, we also recommend contacting your auto insurance company to see if you’re eligible for any new discounts. You can do this at any time – not just when your policy is up for renewal. Many providers offer safety-related and good driving discounts, so it’s always worth a quick phone call or email.

And that’s it! New Englanders have a lot going for them— great restaurants and breweries, easy access to both mountains and the ocean, some pretty great sports teams, and four seasons that offer a lot in terms of recreation and beauty. Make sure you take full advantage of it all by keep your car and tires in top shape, no matter the time of year.

 

Important Than Ever
Fleet electrification is now at a point we might call “technological and economic maturity.” As it relates to electric vehicles (EVs), they’re becoming increasingly affordable, cost effective, capable, and able to perform nearly all the functions of ICE (internal combustion engine) vehicles.


Full vehicle electrification means zero tail pipe emissions, and this fundamental transformation of powertrain technology can (and will) yield a similarly transformational moment for the planet, as vehicle exhaust emissions are greatly reduced, and air quality improves.


While it’s not yet possible to replace every ICE vehicle in the world with an EV, one area ripe for change is fleets. Whether it’s a multinational delivery company, or your local county government, organizations all over North America are seeing the long-term benefits of adopting EVs into their fleets.


ICE Cars and Truck = Bad Air
One of the biggest vehicle segments of polluters in the world is ICE fleets. Every day, millions of ICE vehicles take to the roads and highways of the world to deliver the goods and services that support our modern societies. For any company with a fleet, transitioning away from emissions-heavy vehicles to zero emissions and trucks offer a huge, proportional decline in greenhouse gas emissions. For these companies, the fastest path to meeting corporate environmental goals is integrating EVs into their ESG (Environmental, Social and Governance) strategies.


ESG is Key
ESG is often referred to as sustainability in a business context, but it’s also directly related to a company’s business model; that is, how its products and services contribute to sustainable development. It’s also about a company’s growth and risk management (how it manages its own operations to minimize negative impact).


As organizations adopt and embrace the global ESG push, EVs will play a key role. The speed, simplicity, and effectiveness of adopting EVs can be illustrated in the following examples. Imagine a mid-sized bakery that delivers bread in a city. The bakery might have several ICE delivery vans that bring baked goods and breads to restaurants and various customers, but it also wants to align with ESG goals it has set for itself. In the short term, the bakery might not have the ability to quickly reinvent a more sustainable way to make bread or the time to source sustainably farmed raw materials. But switching to an EV-based fleet (which can be done relatively quickly) not only has an immediate benefit
for their town’s air, but also almost instantly provides the bakery with a big checkmark in the ESG column, and gives them more time to evaluate better, more sustainable ways to produce their goods. Similarly, a giant international plastics company might not have the advanced engineering technologies to make plastics from renewable raw materials. But what it can do is offset its (rather large) emission footprint by adopting the hundreds if not thousands of EVs it will use to deliver product across the globe.


In almost every case, converting to EVs allows a company to say with conviction that “we are truly doing something big for sustainability,” without disrupting every component of their day-to-day operations.

Change is… Easy
The EV revolution is here, and this technology is only getting more powerful, efficient, and affordable. The sooner that you, the local bakery, and the large multi-national plastics maker begin to leverage this technology, the sooner you can start saving money, make your business more sustainable, and position yourself as an industry leader. Converting even a small percentage of ICE vehicles on the road today to a zero-emission powertrain can result in truly remarkable results for both your business and the planet. A trusted EV expert like Merchants Fleet can help you navigate the EV adoption journey by implementing AdoptEV, our proprietary five-step EV implementation framework to both strategically and logistically prepare your organization for the electrification of your fleet and a sustainable
tomorrow.

Author/Author Bio:
Hari Nayar serves as the Director of Electrification & Sustainability at Merchants Fleet. A leading fleet electrification expert, Nayar focuses on providing fleet clients with the tools and insights they need to make a seamless and cost-effective entry into the electric vehicle market.

 
Benefits of Maintaining Proper Tire Pressure with Nitrogen

Tires are designed for a specific pressure, and fuel economy improves by over 3% when that pressure is conserved. However, the US Department of Energy estimates that incorrectly inflated tires waste 3.56 million gallons of gas each year. When tires are filled with nitrogen, they lose pressure four times slower than air-filled tires. Conserving the pressure of tires improves fuel economy, and charge is used more efficiently in the case of electric vehicles. Electric vehicles bring several environmental benefits by themselves, even before adding nitrogen-filled tires. They can run with renewable energy sources, something that is not possible with gas cars. A common argument against EVs is that they provide no benefit when fossil fuels still dominate the power grid. However, this is not the case:

  • Even if a power grid still runs 100% on fossil fuels, electric vehicles reduce emissions in urban areas, concentrating them at power plants.
  • Power stations burn fossil fuels more efficiently than gas cars, and they are subject to more stringent regulations.
  • If a power grid is decarbonized in the future, electric vehicles transition to renewable sources seamlessly – they run with electricity regardless of how it is generated. On the other hand, gas cars cannot switch to clean energy, unless they are modified to become electric.

The benefits of electric vehicles are enhanced with nitrogen-filled tires, thanks to the increase in energy efficiency. However, there are still several barriers to overcome before EVs can become mainstream.

How the Building Sector Can Incentive the Use of EVs

One of the main limitations for electric vehicles is the lack of charging infrastructure. However, building owners can change this by adding parking spaces with EV chargers. This way, owners of electric vehicles can get charge in places other than their homes. If these units have fast charging capabilities, they can fill up an EV during an errand such as going to the supermarket. In addition, building owners who are seeking a LEED certification can earn points by having charging stations.

Since nitrogen-filled tires increase energy efficiency in an EV, each charge lasts slightly longer. The frequency of charging cycles is reduced, and EV batteries have a longer service life as a result. This is a significant benefit, since batteries are among the most expensive components in EVs.

Using Federal Tax Credits to Incentive EVs

The government can also incentive the use of electric vehicles with legislation. Perhaps the best example is the federal tax credit for EVs, which ranges from $2,500 to $7,500 per vehicle. The benefit applies separately for vehicles from each manufacturer, and it starts to phase out when 200,000 EVs of the same brand have been sold.

The full list of eligible vehicles for the tax credit has been published by the US Department of Energy and the US Environmental Protection Agency. Note that the benefit not only covers EVs, but also plug-in electric hybrids.

Synergy Between Nitrogen-Filled Tires and Electric Vehicles

Nitrogen inflation and electric vehicles provide environmental benefits separately, and synergy is achieved when both concepts are combined. While nitrogen-filled tires reduce the energy consumption of vehicles, the use of EVs can help decarbonize transportation by switching to clean energy sources.

Nitrogen also reduces waste, since the gas is free of two corrosive agents found in the air: oxygen and water vapor. Tires not only lose pressure at a slower rate, but they also last longer. The noncorrosive nature of nitrogen is especially beneficial for metallic components of tires, such as rims. At the same time, EV batteries can have a longer service life with less frequent charging cycles.

Credit:
Michael Tobias PE, LEED, AP, CEM
Founder of Chicago Engineers, New York, NY
Mandates Integration of Energy Efficient Green Technology
To Achieve Net Zero Energy Standards

 

Over the course of this century, the use of nitrogen has exploded. Nitrogen is found in a wide array of sources such as factory and power plant emissions, car exhaust and farm fertilizer. Scientists predict that nitrogen levels will rise two or three times above current levels, which can dramatically affect the planet. But despite concerns over the excessive use of nitrogen, there are some applications that consider it beneficial. Two applications that use nitrogen to keep the planet green are tire inflation and forest fertilization.

 

The Benefits of Nitrogen When Used to Fill Up Tires

Typically tires are filled up with air which consists of 78% nitrogen, 21% oxygen and 1% miscellaneous gases. But there are several arguments in favor of filling up tires with pure nitrogen instead:

 

Permeates More Slowly Through Rubber

Compared to oxygen, nitrogen is less likely to migrate through the rubber of tires. Nitrogen can stay in tires approximately 1/3 longer than oxygen. This benefit allows drivers to check their tire pressure less frequently. Monthly tire checks shouldn’t be eliminated, but nitrogen gives drivers better tire pressure and maintenance flexibility (especially for people who don’t maintain their vehicles well).

 

Tire Pressure Stability Over a Longer Period of Time

This results in more consistent inflation pressures, even with sudden changes in temperature. This is one of the main reasons that race car tires are filled with nitrogen; even if the tires heat up quickly there will be a minimal shift in PSI. Nitrogen pressure in tires are also affected by colder temperatures, but will lose PSI at a slower rate than tires filled with air that consists of oxygen.

 

Doesn’t Allow Moisture Into the Tire

The purer the nitrogen content, the less likely moisture will remain in a tire. It takes time to fill and purge the tires with dry nitrogen, but once complete all water will be removed from tires. Filling up with nitrogen will increase the longevity of tires because the tire’s steel components are less susceptible to corrosion. Keeping the bead, sidewall reinforcement and belts dry can ensure that tires will last longer.

 

Improved Fuel Economy

Since filling your tires with nitrogen allows for better pressure retention, you can also improve your vehicle’s fuel economy. According to Edmunds, “under-inflated tires can lower gas mileage by 0.3 percent for every 1 PSI drop in pressure of all four tires”.

 

Diverts Tires From the Landfill

The benefits above allow vehicle owners to have tires that require less maintenance and can be kept for longer periods of time. The longer tires can be used, the less we’ll see in landfills. The manufacturing and disposal of tires is resource intensive, so the longer they can be used the better.

 

The Benefits of Nitrogen When Used to Fertilize Forests

To a certain degree, nitrogen can be beneficial to plant life and act as a fertilizer to encourage growth. With the predicted increase in nitrogen levels over the next century, scientists are curious to see how forests will react to two or three times more nitrogen than we’re seeing today. Kurt Pregitzer and his team at the University of Nevada, Reno decided to fertilize four experimental forests in northern Michigan to find out.

 

As expected, the increased levels of nitrogen stimulated tree growth. The extra growth and maturity of the trees will allow more carbon to be absorbed from the atmosphere and stored. But what surprised Pregitzer and his team was the slower decomposition of the twigs and other tree litter on the forest floor. According to The Atlantic, “lignin—the tough substance that gives vegetables their crunch and is quite good at storing carbon—proved more resistant to the forest floor’s microbes”. Having more lignin on the forest floors also allows for more carbon to be sequestered. Pregitzer said that the team didn’t anticipate the effect nitrogen would have on the storage of carbon in the soil.

 

Final Thoughts

Although the explosion of human-induced nitrogen has some negative effects on environmental and human health, there are some ways in which nitrogen can also be useful. When applied to tires, nitrogen can help improve the fuel economy of vehicles and allow owners to replace their tires less frequently. By extending the lifecycle of tires, less resources are being used to manufacture them and more tires are being diverted from the landfills.

 

In this time of climate uncertainty, carbon sinks are becoming increasingly important. From the research conducted by Pregitzer and his team, we see the benefits of nitrogen as a fertilizer and ability to enhance the forest floor’s carbon capture. Although more research needs to be done to understand this change in soil chemistry, we’re able to see how forests might benefit from increases in nitrogen levels.

 

Tire Alignment Basics

On December 2, 2015, in Fuel Efficiency, Tire Care, by admin
0

The proper alignment of your car’s tires are crucial in order for it to
perform adequately. When mechanics talk about tire alignment, they
are looking specifically at toe, camber, and caster alignment.
Having your wheels aligned correctly will help keep you safe on the
road and boost your fuel economy.

What Does Alignment Refer To?

When someone tells you that your tires need to be aligned, they are
referring to adjusting the vehicle’s suspension so that the wheels
are angled correctly. Wheels can be adjusted by placing the car on
an alignment rack and having a computer measure the angles of the
wheels. The person working on your car will then adjust the wheels
based on these measurements. Four-wheel alignments are recommended
over two-wheel alignments, because four-wheel alignments will
properly adjust all four wheels at the same time.

Why Should I Get My Tires Aligned?

Getting your tires properly aligned is important for not only your safety,
but also the lifespan of your tires. Proper tire alignment makes
handling your vehicle significantly easier. Wheels that are out of
alignment will lead to tires that have uneven tread wear. Getting
your tires aligned is easy at places such as Action
Gator Tire
, and they offer a four-wheel alignment service that
will allow you to maximize the life of your tires and cut down on
fuel costs.

When Do I Need a Tire Alignment?

There are no specific requirements for how often you should get your tires
aligned. However, wheels can come out of alignment from everyday
driving, or from hitting potholes or curbs. There are a few indications that your tires
need to be aligned. Here are some of the ways that you can tell when
your vehicle’s wheels need to be aligned:

  • Vehicle pulls strongly to one side

  • Uneven or abnormal tire wear

  • Steering wheel vibration

  • Steering wheel off center

Toe, Caster, and Camber

There are three factors that contribute to proper wheel alignment: toe,
caster, and camber. Toe alignment is the measurement between tires.
When viewed from above, the tires should be parallel to each other
and in equal positions. Caster is the angle of the steering pivot,
and plays a huge role in balancing steering and stability. Positive
caster means that the steering axis tilts toward the driver, while
negative caster means that the steering axis tilts toward the front
end of your vehicle. Lastly, camber is the angle of the wheel, and
it should not have too much inward or outward tilt (negative and
positive camber). Instead, it should be perpendicular to the ground.

Boost Your Performance and Schedule a Wheel Alignment

Getting four-wheel alignment is important because it can help you prolong the
life of your tires and boost the performance of your vehicle.
Vehicles that are out of alignment will suffer from uneven tread wear
and poor tire performance. It is recommended that you schedule an
appointment immediately if you suspect you are in need of a wheel
alignment.

 

Tips to Avoid Problems Using Snowfall Tires Using a Tire Pressure Monitoring System

Tire Pressure Monitoring SystemsOver the last few years the government has cracked down on car drivers who have switched tires for the season but haven’t had their Tire Pressure Monitoring System (TPMS) replaced. Most garages used to replace them for free back in the day but nowadays you will see plenty of garages charging for this.

The truth is that you can avoid this, and you can also avoid having any issues with your TPMS when you switch from summer to winter tires.

One big tip is to avoid pot holes because our roads are scattered with these annoying dips and they do have a massive effect on tire pressure, not just in cold conditions but during any time of the year.  If you are driving on well-known routes then just pay attention to these, and avoid them if you can.

 

Why Does Cold Weather Affect my TPMS?

Snow is always going to set off your TPMS sensor, and it won’t take long until you see that lovely light illuminate your dash.

Are you ready for the science behind this?

When we get a bout of cold spells, or snow, the air in your tire will become much denser than when it is warm, especially when the car has been left overnight during a particular cold or snowy period.

However, as soon as you have drove around for 20-30 minutes you should notice that as the tires get warmer through friction, your light on the dashboard should turn itself off. Just give this tip a try before you decide to take it to our local garage as you should find that this works. Oh, and you shouldn’t worry too much on colder mornings if you see your TPMS light show up, that is normal behavior.

If you are seeing the light more frequently, just be aware that for every 10 degree drop in temperature, you will lose on average 1 pound of air pressure out of each tire.

This brings us nicely onto nitrogen for your tires.

 

So Why Use Nitrogen?

If you don’t check your tire pressure regularly then some good advice is to start using Nitrogen which will help in reducing TPMS resets.

Most new cars come with these funky new dashboard lights that tell you when your tire pressure is low. The problem is, you will stop by a garage and pump air into them, and then hey presto a few weeks later that lights back on again.

However, if you were to use nitrogen your tire could last months longer, meaning you don’t have to see that annoying flashing light appear so often.

You see, replacing oxygen, water vapor and other gases that go into a standard tire, with nitrogen, will mean your tire pressure will maintain at a certain level for a lot longer. So if you were to use 95% nitrogen in your tires you would be looking at a retainer of optimal pressure for as much as 4 times longer than if you had 22% of oxygen, water vapor and other gases.

Perhaps the biggest reason for people using nitrogen is that not only can you keep a well-balanced tire pressure but you can increase fuel efficiency, safety and generally a longer tire life for each of the 4 tires on your car.

Learn more about tire sensors at the Tire Sensor Warehouse.

 

Nitronomics Blog: Save Money & the EnvironmentGoNitroTire on Facebook
© 2008 All rights reserved GoNitro Inc. (dba GoNitroTire) Privacy Policy
Duplication of any portion of this website without prior written consent from GoNitro Inc. is prohibited.